LED Heat sinking guide

9 12 2011

Without LEDs, companies such as Amphenol would be unable to offer the range of connectors and various other electronic components which they currently do.  

An LED is essentially a semiconductor light source. They are used as indicator lamps in a vast range of electronic devices and were first introduced in 1962.

When power LEDs first arrived onto the market, a number of lighting firms rushed out solid-state luminaries only to find them failing in service.

The fundamental problem was heat sinking. Manufacturers were used to filament bulbs that run hot and are cooled by radiation.

That may have been a while ago now. However, the danger of producing unreliable products still exists, particularly as manufacturing companies strive to keep costs down to a minimum.

How do heat sinks work?

The heat generated by complex devices and circuitry can often threaten the reliability of a product and, in some cases, tamper with the ability of a device to function correctly.

With this in mind, heat sinks have become an essential part of modern electronics manufacturing.  Several companies would simply be unable to produce high quality equipment without using this technique.

They are used to reduce and control the temperature of items such as microprocessors through sophisticated heat dissipation techniques. It is at times a complex, but necessary process.

They are basically made up of a small metal structure which includes flat surfaces to ensure good thermal contact with the components that need to be cooled.

A heat sink absorbs and dissipates heat from another object using thermal contact. They are used in a vast range of applications which could include anything that requires efficient and effective protection from heat.

For additional details on Amphenol’s LED product range and additional electronic components from other leading manufacturers such as Nicomatic and ebm-papst, visit www.challengercomponents.com





Conflicting reports leave semiconductor market in uncertain state

8 12 2011

Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International (SEMI) have suggested that semiconductor manufacturing equipment could grow by 4.7% in 2011 to a total of $41.8 billion. However, they also feel that 2012 could see a decline by approximately 10.8% on that figure.

Assembly and packaging equipment is also expected to decline by approximately 12.5% to $3.4 billion.

This news follows a recent report from Gartner Inc which suggests that an industry-wide inventory correction process will have a serious impact on general sales of semiconductors.

However, in contrast to SEMI, Gartner actually anticipate that the situation will improve during 2012.

At the end of June this year, official semiconductor stockpiles with suppliers stood at 83.4 days of inventory (DOI).

This exceeds the previous record of 83.1 DOI from the first quarter of 2008.

IHS iSuppli claims the news is “raising concerns over the near-term outlook for the chip market.”

The level is 11% higher than the historical average which is usually recorded for this period.

The last major oversupply, seen in the first quarter of 2008, signalled the beginning of a 2 year downturn in the semiconductor industry.

Sharon Stiefel, semiconductor analyst at IHS, voiced her fears over what this could mean for the industry.

“For the semiconductor industry, wading into such troubling territory – reminiscent of the dark days leading into the recession – could herald the beginning of a critical inventory adjustment period.

“The correction is likely to take place during the next few quarters and will not be completed until mid-2012. As such, it will involve suppliers making a prolonged reduction in their inventory levels to avoid dangerous oversupply situations.”

These conflicting reports seem to guarantee only one thing. There are likely to be uncertain times ahead for the semiconductor industry in the future.

It may be wise for companies to play their cards close to their chest until everybody is further into 2012.





European Semiconductor growth continues

7 12 2011

WSTS (World Semiconductor Trade Statistics) have reported ‘remarkably positive’ European growth rates towards the end of 2011 for a number of the main semiconductor product categories.

European semiconductor sales have increased by 3.2% compared to the same period in 2010, on a year-to-date scale.

Specifically, September saw an increase in the sales of sensors and actuators by 3.6%. MOS memory also grew notably by 3.8% in total.

On a global scale, semiconductor sales in September stood at $25.76 billion. This represents an increase of 2.7% from August.

These results come just months after excessive inventory actually played a big part in serving as a real boost for the global semiconductor industry in the first quarter of this year.

The level of inventory helped to alleviate the damage done by the Japanese earthquake which hit the country, and the electronics industry, so hard in February of this year.

The shortage of basic components such as semiconductors was not nearly as bad as it could have been.

The statistics show that the days of inventory (DOI) among chip suppliers stood at an estimated 80.3 days at the end of the first quarter in 2011. This was up by 1.1% from the 79.4 days in the final quarter of 2010, and it was also an increase of 9.1 days from the same period in 2010.

In total, this represented a 2 year high and just goes to show that excessive inventory is not always a negative thing necessarily.

For additional information on products including semiconductors, centrifugal fans, axial compact fans and a host of other electronic components, visit www.challengercomponents.com

Challenger Components also work with a number of established brands such as Nicomatic, ebm-papst and 3M interconnect. All of these companies have proud reputations for producing a range of high quality goods to the electronics sector.





Cable Assembly Outsourcing

6 12 2011

Despite being a very important part of global electronics manufacturing, cable assembly often requires a great deal of time, effort and energy. Primarily due to the associated costs involved and time demands, companies will often look to outsource their cable assembly.

Employing a group of individuals who are trained to carry out intricate cable assembly means that you will have to pay them according to their appropriate level of skill.

That could mean that you need to employ additional staff to do the job, or update the skills set of exiting employees. Either way, your specific staff costs will undoubtedly be reduced by outsourcing all of your cable assembly requirements.

The machinery which is needed to carry out cable assembly can be complex to use and expensive to purchase.

Provided you have a high level of faith in the company you have asked to carry out your cable assembly, it is wise to let them take on the inherent risks of such a process.

This means you will have more time to ask your own staff to focus on other areas that require attention.

Of course, outsourcing your cable assembly is not something that every company will choose to do. Some large companies within the electronics manufacturing industry will have both the manpower and the finances to take care of the issue themselves.

However, the majority of businesses are not this fortunate. They may have little choice but to eliminate as many of their outgoings as possible.

Companies in this situation will view the idea of outsourcing their cable assembly as an indisputable necessity rather than an optional luxury.

Leading connector manufacturers

Challenger Components have over 50 years of experience in connector products and a variety of additional electrical components. They also work alongside a number of leading brand names within the electronics manufacturing industry such as Amphenol, Nicomatic and 3M.

For full details of all the products available from manufacturers such as those named above, contact www.challengercomponents.com

 

 

 





Cross flow fans and axial fans profile

5 12 2011

Cross flow fans are otherwise known as Tangential Fans or Tubular Fans. It is generally tubular in shape with its length being more important than its diameter.

The air flow is in the tangential direction to the fan itself and hence the alternate name. Due to this, these fans are generally more efficient than a number of their counterparts.

Cross Flow Fans work by improving the dissipation of the heat generated by other components through circulation.

If the nearby component is already cool or the humidity is particularly high then these fans are not likely to make much of an impact.

Its advantages are that it is compact and runs without much noise amongst other things. It is mostly used in air conditioners, heating and cooling equipment to dissipate the heat generated in these components.

These fans have adjustable speed controllers and are more suited to use inside other main components.

In contrast, axial fans consist of a rotating arrangement of blades which act on the air. Usually contained within a casing, the blades used force the air to move parallel to the shaft about which the blades rotate.

The name of this specific fan comes from its propensity to blow air along the fan, and they have many modern day applications.

Within the electronics industry specifically, they are used to for cooling certain items of equipment. This is a vital cog within the whole process of constructing and transporting electrical connectors for example.

The larger varieties of axial fans are seen in mechanisms such as wind tunnels. Smaller types can be used for all manner of electronics work.

Given the size of some wind tunnels, it gives you an idea of how large certain axial fans can actually be.

For additional details on both of the antistatic products mentioned above, as well as the benefits of static training, visit www.challengercomponents.com

 





New research spells further bad news for semiconductor sales

1 12 2011

New research from Gartner Inc suggests that a forthcoming inventory correction process in the electronics manufacturing industry will continue to affect sales prospects negatively for the rest of 2011.

However, it is also widely hoped that 2012 will see an upturn in this regard once the market begins to stabilise.

This news follows a suggestion by leading market analyst IHs iSuppli that component inventories held by semiconductor suppliers during the second quarter of this year increased to levels not seen since the start of the last downturn in 2008.

At the end of June this year, official semiconductor stockpiles with suppliers stood at 83.4 days of inventory (DOI).

This exceeds the previous record of 83.1 DOI from the first quarter of 2008.

IHS iSuppli claims the news is “raising concerns over the near-term outlook for the chip market.”

The level is 11% higher than the historical average which is usually recorded for this period. The last major oversupply, seen in the first quarter of 2008, signalled the beginning of a 2 year downturn in the semiconductor industry.

Sharon Stiefel, semiconductor analyst at IHS, voiced her fears over what this could mean for the entire semiconductor industry.

“For the semiconductor industry, wading into such troubling territory – reminiscent of the dark days leading into the recession – could herald the beginning of a critical inventory adjustment period.

“The correction is likely to take place during the next few quarters and will not be completed until mid-2012. As such, it will involve suppliers making a prolonged reduction in their inventory levels to avoid dangerous oversupply situations.”

In total, this represented a 2 year high and just goes to show that excessive inventory is not always a negative thing necessarily.

For additional information on semiconductors, visit www.challengercomponents.com





The power of antistatic products

30 11 2011

It is a necessity to buy anti static products for many companies within the manufacturing industry, especially when your work is related to the field of electronics. Such products are significant in protecting both you and the electronic components from the so-called ‘static charge build-up.’

Such build-up of electric charge on the surface of an object, known as the static electricity, can damage electronic components beyond repair. This is the reason why this should not be taken for granted—hence, it is really important to grab the following anti static products;

Anti Static Mat: This product is particularly useful for reducing the chance of getting in contact with static. The anti static mat is put beneath the components or the person working on them. This is to ensure the safety for the electronics and to avoid static shocks, especially when surrounded by electronic devices.

Anti Static Bags: When you need to ship or move electronic components, such as memory sticks, hard drives and sound cards, the use of anti static bags is important. This anti static product is use to deflect the natural static electricity which are usually built up during the journey.

Anti Static Clothing: As its name implies, it is utilised to protect the person working on the electronic devices and the devices themselves from the static electrical charges.

Ankle and Heel Straps: These can also be used to help protect users from currents and allow accumulated charge to seep away from the body.

These items work in an equally intricate way, dissipating electrical charge to specially implanted floor tiles to increase protection. They are particularly good for anyone who needs to be mobile when working as it is preferable to avoid a grounding cable in this cable.

For full information on all the antistatic equipment available, visit www.challengercomponents.com

 








%d bloggers like this: